What Brilliance Looks Like

What Brilliance Looks Like

We often judge the most brilliant people because they’re different. But we don’t need them to be normal; we need them to be brilliant.
 
 

The world needs brilliance, and it always has. It’s rare and powerful, and when it has a chance to reach its full potential in just the right circumstances, we are all better off for it.

But brilliance can be a challenge. Those among us who march to the beat of a different drummer can be intimidating, or even strange. They don’t do small talk very well. You might not invite them to your next dinner party. They are not standard in any way.

In fact, brilliance has never looked standard and can even appear to be broken. Albert Einstein didn’t speak until he was 4. Thomas Jefferson had an inability to relate to others. Nikola Tesla had intense sensitivity to light and sound. Sir Isaac Newton was quiet, not good at small talk, had extreme focus and would even forget to eat when he had too much to think about.

Today, Einstein would likely be diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome. Jefferson is suspected to have had attention deficit disorder. Tesla possibly had mania. Sir Isaac Newton’s symptoms sound like a social anxiety disorder. We tend to label what we don’t really understand. We have certainly done that today to try and explain many of the very qualities that throughout history have been critical signposts and evidence of brilliance.

Just think about Thomas Edison for a minute. What if you were one of his neighbors? Would you think he was crazy? He was always going in and out of his laboratory, sometimes staying there for days on end. It was rumored that he was so obsessive that he might not bathe or change clothes for days while he was on the hunt for something no one had ever thought of before. Ten thousand experiments to invent the light bulb? No problem. Creating the recording industry all by himself? A piece of cake. But the regular routines of life had to wait. He lived with few distractions on purpose because he had more important work to do.

Ten thousand experiments to invent the light bulb? No problem. Creating the recording industry all by himself? A piece of cake. But the regular routines of life had to wait.

Not surprisingly, there was a time when Edison’s mother had to rescue him. He was so far out of the educational norms of his day that she received a note one day that essentially said he was unteachable and unwelcome in the classroom. Edison was expelled because the system found him unworthy. His mother famously told him that the note said that he was really special and smart—too smart, in fact, to be in the regular school with the other kids who were certainly not his equal. So she home-schooled him, and he became a great inventor who transformed society. She is an unsung hero. Young Edison didn’t fit into the system, and neither do most brilliant people that we revere.

Related: Amazing Quotes

I’ve studied tens of thousands of brilliant people, read their biographies, gotten to “know” them as much as I have been able to. And I have discovered this pattern: All of these geniuses were not like the rest of the world at all. But they are all very similar to each other. Each have had their own unique quirks and issues, and yet those very issues, and how they coped with them, are part of what made them amazing.

Let’s face it: The average person rolls along through life just trying to get from one day to the other. Brilliant people can’t imagine living their lives that way. In fact, they don’t know how. Their creative motor is always running, and they are just fine with that. Elon Musk is taking us to Mars! He can’t watch TV all day and still pull that off.

The truth is, we don’t need these people to be normal or standard in any way. We need them to try and fail 10,000 times to invent the next light bulb, or figure out a way to fly, or go to Mars, or improve our lives in some way that we would never have thought of or predicted. Why? Because they are brilliant and they always have been, even when the rest of the world is not quite sure what to make of them.

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​May Your Wisdom Guide You on Your Way to Success & Freedom

SANDRA BRAVO

 Entrepreneur ☆ International Speaker ☆ #1 Best Selling Author ☆ Women Empowerment

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source : www.success.com

9 Ways to Stay Productive When You Work From Home

9 Ways to Stay Productive When You Work From Home

Too much chatter at the office? Doctor’s appointment in the middle of the day? Whether you work remotely on a regular basis or as a sometimes-perk, working from home can be an excellent alternative to sitting in a cubical. The key to work-from-home success is to create an environment that allows you to focus on the tasks at hand. It is possible to be comfortable and productive at the same time!

Here are some genius ways to create a functional but productive work area at home.

1. Select a space based on your needs.

The home office serves a great purpose, but it isn’t for everybody all the time. Would you like to fuel your creativity, or do you prefer a quiet environment for crunching numbers? You may find yourself curled up on the sofa one day and at the dining table the next, depending on the project. Determine how you usually divide your day. For example, are you more creative in the morning? You may spend that time writing or brainstorming ideas for your latest project. The afternoons then could be a more relaxed time spent sitting on the sofa, sifting through emails and completing the rest of your tasks for the workday.

2. Declutter.

Whether you work in a home office, kitchen or living room, if there’s “stuff” around that reminds you of your household chores, your eyes will go there and you’ll get distracted. Whenever you work from home, claim a clutter-free zone. This will help you stay focused on your workload and remain more aligned with an in-office experience.

3. Get ready for the day.

Many people think working from home means sitting around in pajamas with the television on in the background. Not true! Just like in an office setting, you have to set yourself up for success when working from home. Get ready as you would if you were going into the office. Set a morning ritual of getting dressed (no loungewear!), making your morning cup of coffee and doing whatever else you need to get in the right mindset. You may also want to jot down your work to-do list for the day. You increase your chances of being productive when you set an intention.

4. Put yourself in a good position.

Some people find it easy to work in bed or on the sofa. In either case, if you’re not sitting at a table, make sure you’ve got a small one within easy reach. You might not have a host of paperwork strewn out in front of you, but you will benefit from having the space to set a glass of water and your phone. Coffee tables and side tables fit the bill for any time you need extra space. You can also use a c-table to prop your laptop up to eye level and reduce strain on your neck. In addition to finding a surface space, you’ll also want to make sure to keep your posture in check. Prop yourself up with a few throw pillows to help maintain proper body alignment.

5. Turn on the lights.

Natural light through the windows can be lovely, but it can also cause glare on your computer screen. If windows work to your benefit and the view isn’t distracting, great. If not, pull the blinds and flip on the light switch. Table lamps and floor lamps provide targeted task light if your space has insufficient overhead lighting.

6. Create a home office ambiance.

One of the perks of working from home is being able to create a personalized work area in a way you may not be able to at the office. It’s all about creating a cozy yet productive space that is perfectly suited to your individual working style. Add elements that promote a calming or inspiring environment, such as fresh flowers, houseplants, task lighting, candles or beautiful crystals.

No matter if you work from home sporadically, a few days a week or all the time, you’ll need to plan out your daily schedule. Establish your start time, midday break periods and what time you’ll clock out for the day. This will keep you on track with your workload. It also sends the message to your co-workers that you have a relatively set schedule—just like you would in the office.

8. Get out.

While working from your sofa can be great most of the time, sometimes you need to break up the day. Take a 10-minute walk around the block to freshen up and to encourage the flow of new ideas. Looking for a change of scenery? Head over to your local coffee shop or library to work there for a few hours as it fits into your schedule. Or, if you know others who work from home, invite them over for an informal co-working group. This will not only help you get closer to the in-office experience, but it can also be a substitute for watercooler chats and workplace socializing.

9. Log off!

One of the most important aspects of a healthy work-from-home routine is creating boundaries. Log off for the day—and not just from your laptop. Consider developing a phrase you say to yourself at the end of the day, to signal your mind that it’s time to stop thinking about work. Have a last-minute idea come up after office hours? Jot it down, but come back to it tomorrow. Just because you have access to work anytime doesn’t mean you should be logged in 24/7. Allow yourself to have downtime to create a work-life balance—we all need it, no matter where we are working.

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May Your Wisdom Guide You on Your Way to Success & Freedom

SANDRA BRAVO

 Entrepreneur ☆ International Speaker ☆ #1 Best Selling Author ☆ Women Empowerment

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Source: success.com

How to Set Solid Resolutions

How to Set Solid Resolutions

New Year’s resolutions are ubiquitous and, more often than not, colossal failures. Researchers say less than 50 percent of resolutions are abandoned after only three months. Ultimately, fewer than 20 percent of New Year’s resolutions are successful.

Related: Amazing Quotes

The key to staying on track to lose weight, spend more time with family or reach personal finance goals is in the setup as much as the execution. Next month in How To, we’ll discuss ways you can stay on track through the whole year, but the first step—goal-setting—is most important. The case studies that follow offer real-life resolution wins and bombs, but here are some guidelines for reaching your goals this year and onward.

  • Be realistic. If you have struggled with your weight for a lifetime, expecting yourself to lose your belly fat by swimsuit season might be too big a mountain to climb.
  • Inspire yourself. Create a goal that makes you excited. For example, if you really want to get your spending under control, set a savings goal for an experience that you cannot wait to do. For example, “Pay off my credit card and save $3,000 so I can join my best friends on a trip to Cuba this winter.”
  • Identify and trust the process. If your goal is weight loss, the goal might not be a specific weight, but hiring a nutritionist, exercising two days weekly, and cutting sugar out of your diet.
  • Celebrate the wins. In addition to big goals, identify smaller landmarks to recognize, and bake in how you will celebrate. Growing your business to a certain sales figure might be met with the reward of a new laptop, or great tickets to a sporting event. Keep the good vibes going all year long.

 

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​May Your Wisdom Guide You on Your Way to Success & Freedom

SANDRA BRAVO

 Entrepreneur ☆ International Speaker ☆ #1 Best Selling Author ☆ Women Empowerment

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Get a copy of my #1 BestSeller Book here >>

How One Woman In Uganda Is Speaking Out Against Gender-Based Violence

How One Woman In Uganda Is Speaking Out Against Gender-Based Violence

By 23, Amanda Banura of Uganda has overcome more than many people do in a lifetime. At a young age, Amanda was raped by her father’s friend.

“The first time, I didn’t know [what was happening],” she said. “This guy came and found me sleeping. He just took off my bed sheet, and started touching me … Then he told me, ‘If you talk, I’m going to beat you up. And if you tell your father, I’ll kill you.’”

As we’ve recently been hearing from so many women around the world, Amanda was a victim of gender-based violence, one of the most pervasive human rights abuses globally that knows no social, economic, or geographical bounds. Worldwide, an estimated one in three of us will experience physical or sexual abuse in our lifetime. Gender-based violence occurs in many forms – including intimate partner or domestic violence, sexual violence, and threat and coercion – and directly impacts our sexual and reproductive health and rights.

Women and girls who experience gender-based violence have had their basic human rights violated and are at increased risk of a myriad of other sexual and reproductive health threats, including unintended pregnancy, unsafe abortion, and sexually transmitted diseases. In some regions, for example, survivors of violence are 50 percent more likely to acquire HIV. Women who face intimate partner or domestic violence are also routinely denied access to contraceptives or essential reproductive health care by these partners, hindering their ability to plan their family, pursue an education, or get a job. Gender-based violence is exacerbated in humanitarian emergencies and conflicts, where violence and rape are used as a tactic of war and displaced women and girls are at increased risk in the midst of chaos. Often, safe spaces and local health clinics run by international organizations such as the UN Population Fund (UNFPA) are the only place of refuge for survivors.

This violence takes a toll at a global level, too. Studies have shown that the estimated cost of violence is somewhere between one and two percent of gross domestic product. Ending violence against women is essential to achieving gender equality, one of the Sustainable Development Goals.

Amanda, like many survivors of violence, stayed silent about her abuse for many years. It was only when she received a scholarship to attend the 2013 International Conference on Family Planning and spoke to many young women like her that she realized that she was not alone.

 

“I went [to the conference] and met a group of vibrant young people, and I got to listen to many experiences from different countries, and I was like, ‘I’m not the only one who is really bad off,’” she said. “I was sexually harassed … by a relative to my father. I didn’t tell anyone because at the time. … I was so scared, I was so vulnerable.”

When she returned to Uganda after the conference, Amanda was determined to take action on behalf of young people in her country. She started the Ugandan Youth Alliance, which works to empower Ugandan youth to lead interventions and decisions on family planning and sexual and reproductive health and rights. Amanda’s work is particularly important in a country where three-quarters of the population is under age 30. Her project is hosted by Reproductive Health Uganda, an international reproductive health and family planning NGO that received U.S. foreign aid.

With stories like Amanda’s happening around the world, the U.S. has a critical role to play in ensuring the sexual and reproductive health and rights of women and girls worldwide, including standing up against gender-based violence. Bi-partisan leaders in Congress have taken an important first step in re-introducing the International Violence Against Women Act. But the reinstatement of the Global Gag Rule and the defunding of UNFPA, two harmful actions by the U.S. administration, jeopardize the work of international gender-based violence programs like those run by Reproductive Health Uganda, by UNFPA, and by survivors just like Amanda. In adopting the Sustainable Development Goals, 193 countries – including the United States – agreed that the world should leave no one behind. It’s time we live up to those goals. Every person, every story counts.

 

May Your Wisdom Guide You on Your Way to Success & Freedom

SANDRA BRAVO

 Entrepreneur ☆ International Speaker ☆ #1 Best Selling Author ☆ Women Empowerment

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source: https://www.huffingtonpost.com

My Top 10 Money Habits for Entrepreneurs

My Top 10 Money Habits for Entrepreneurs

Over the past 10 years, my business partner and I have seen our personal finance websitegrow from a small Australian credit card blog to a $50 million global business. Along the way, I’ve picked up a number of money habits that have been crucial in helping me realize my financial and business goals. Here are my top 10.

1. Develop and track clear goals.

It’s absolutely key that you develop clear financial goals in both the long and short term. Consider what financial milestones you want to hit in six months, a year, 10 years from now, and write it all down. Create a clear (and realistic) plan to guide you, and regularly review it and adapt as your situation changes. Too many people put these things together and then file them away in a folder or drawer, never to look at them again. I set calendar notes for check-ins, and when I’m reviewing my plan, I ask myself: What have I achieved since last check-in? Are these goals still realistic for the period in which they were set? What tools do I need that I don’t already have to make these happen?

2. Consider your options.

When starting out, it can be difficult to make your business ideas come to life. A business loan can assist with early financial strain and keep cash flow moving. However, it is important to pay attention to how much you borrow, as you don’t want this turning into additional pressure later on. Compare your options to make sure you’re getting the best deal out there for your business.

3. Remember that a first offer is just a starting point.

If every entrepreneur accepted the first “no” they received, there’d be much fewer businesses existing today. Whether I’m trying to turn a “no” into a “yes” or negotiate a better price, I always try to walk away with the best deal possible. This goes for business dealings and when making a personal purchase. I truly believe the art of negotiation is something everyone can learn, and once mastered, you’ll be surprised how much people are willing to stray from their first offer. Straight up ask if that is the best possible deal, or even go so far as to suggest potential discount terms (for example, if buying in bulk or paying in cash).

4. Integrate outsourcing.

In today’s digital world, we have the ability to work with quality professionals all across the globe, enabling businesses to recruit top talent on a needs basis. By integrating outsourcing, you’ll likely be paying a cheaper price for high-quality work and avoiding funds wasted on underutilized full-time staff. You might need to deal with international money transfers if outsourcing, but by comparing providers, you can ensure that the overall costs of these services still work in your favor.

Related: Amazing Quotes

5. Monitor your expenses.

It sounds simple, but a golden rule of mine is to always spend less than you earn. In America, for too long we’ve taken credit as a given. Keep tabs on your income, regular expenses and additional expenses, and don’t forget to accommodate room for savings. This will not only give you greater insight into where your money is going and a heightened sense of control, but it’s also a great way to help you reach your financial milestones.

6. Bootstrap.

When Frank and I first started finder, we worked off an old laptop that had missing keys, didn’t pay ourselves for years and subleased rooms in our apartment to substitute for income. Where you can, keep spending to a minimum. Think outside the box to stretch your dollar further, like using a co-working space to share services and equipment or utilizing assets you already have, like older computers and tech.

7. Grow, don’t spend.

Don’t spend your money before you’ve earned it and don’t bet on success. It may sound cliché, but it’s important to expect (and plan for) the unexpected. By concentrating on revenue, as opposed to expenditure, you’ll have a much greater chance of growing as a business. You never know when you might take a hit, so it’s better to hold off the extravagant purchases for the financial security of your business.

8. Invest in your team.

AMASSSING HABITS

  

When it comes to the welfare of your team, my attitude toward money shifts a little. Your team is your family, the people who will accompany you to the top. By investing in them, you’ll likely boost workplace productivity and create a culture based on respect. At finder, we have a robust training and development program, encourage team members to pursue passion projects, and allow flexibility. This not only empowers individuals, it prevents burnout and inspires creativity—all positives for our business as well as for our people.

9. Never stop asking questions.

We learn by asking questions and seeking the advice from people more knowledgeable than ourselves. This could be a financial adviser, a business planner or even a well-versed friend. The point is, listen actively and utilize the resources that surround you each and every day. This will be much more beneficial than sticking to what you know and staying in the same place.

10. Stay humble.

Although finder’s global expansion is well underway, Frank and I have never forgotten our beginnings, where we worked off that broken laptop, striving toward our early goals. We get taken back to our early days when starting up in a new place, as it’s a whole new market. My point is, regardless of how much money you make, remember where you started, don’t get carried away, and never lose the drive and passion that inspired you to take this journey in the first place.

 

​May Your Wisdom Guide You on Your Way to Success & Freedom

SANDRA BRAVO

 Entrepreneur ☆ International Speaker ☆ #1 Best Selling Author ☆ Women Empowerment

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FOLLOW ME:

     

Get a copy of my #1 BestSeller Book here >>

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